Rhino Fact vs Myth

To quote Matt, “rhinos are just chubby grey unicorns”. Here are some myths and facts you should know about the incredible, beautiful rhinocerous.

Over centuries myths about rhinos have spread and some are widely believed to this day. Many of these myths contribute directly to the poaching crisis that currently threatens the survival of rhinos as an entire species.

Knowledge is power and by spreading the truth about rhinos and debunk these fatal myths, each and every person can help save the rhino.

Knowledge is power and by spreading the truth about rhinos and debunk these fatal myths, each and every person can help save the rhino.

Rhino horn is medicinal

Many cultures have long-perpetuated a myth that rhino horn possesses medicinal, healing, or nourishing qualities. This is 100% false. In fact, rhino horn is made of something called ‘keratin’ just like our fingernails.

Rumors and legends have been circulating about rhino horn’s magical medical uses in Asian regions for over 2,000 years. These stories of cancer cures and youth tinctures have led to a decimation of the rhino population for a compound that we all trim regularly off our fingertips.

Rhino horn is an aphrodesiac or sexual stimulant

Another fatal myth perpetuated about rhino horn is that it has the properties of a sexual stimulant like Viagra. This is pure myth, you might as well chew on your fingernails before going on a date..

Rhino horn is a drug

In Asia, rhino horn is ground into powder and sold on the black market as a party drug similar to cocaine. Unlike actual drugs, rhino horn has absolutely no effect on the brain, nervous system, or body. There are no pharmaceutical effects of rhino horn, again, it is like nibbling on your fingernails and expecting the effects of illicit drugs.

Rhino horn is a good thing to make souvenirs out of

Similar to ivory souvenirs, some cultures believe that rhino horns make beautiful trinkets including knife handles, cups, knick-knacks, and figurines. Innocent rhinos pay with their lives to create these useless dust-collectors, artisans would be far better off using porcelain, wood, glass, or any other in a host of available materials..